Steve’s Underutilized Trees for Small Yards: Foresteria pubescens (Desert olive)

Forestiera pubescens

Forestiera pubescens by Stan Shebs

Foresteria pubescens; Photo TexasAMU

Foresteria pubescens; Photo TexasA MU

Foresteria pubescens (Desert olive, New Mexico privet, Stretchberry)

This tree has an interesting multi-stem form with green leaves and white bark that is clean and smooth like ivory!

  • Deciduous Perennial with brilliant yellow fall color
  • Yellow blooms provide wonderful spring color around St. Patrick’s Day
  • Attracts birds for shelter and provides food source from the blue toned fruit
  • Enjoys full sun to part shade

It is a suitable substitute for Ligustrum species (Privets) because it’s native to the area and thrives, while Privets are likely to suffer at best.

 

Reference links to check out:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/ornamentals/nativeshrubs/forestierapubescen.htm

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Forestiera_pubescens

Steve’s Underutilized Trees for Small Yards: Pinus monophylla (The Single-leaf Pinion)

 
 

 

Pinus monophylla

Steve's Pinus monophylla

Pinus monophylla (Single-leaf Pinion)

The appearance of this tree has been described as “rustic”. It’s hue compliments many types of landscapes.

 

 

Pinus monophylla (The Single-leaf Pinion) Photo Credit: Dcrjsr wikimedia.org

Pinus monophylla (The Single-leaf Pinion) Photo Credit: Dcrjsr wikimedia.org

Steve’s Underutilized Trees for Small Yards: Quercus turbinella

Steve Glimp is our leading Certified Arborist here at Schilling Horticulture. He has studied Conservation Biology, Ornamental Horticulture, and has experience as a Field Botanist. He has created this compilation of trees ideal for small gardens that he believes have been underutilized in Southern Nevada. This series of posts will explore those trees and hopefully help spread some well-deserved appreciation for them!

Quercus turbinella; Photo credit: eol.org

Quercus turbinella; Photo credit: eol.org

Quercus turbinella
This shrubby tree has been described as “picturesque and very ornamental”.

  • Begins small and shrubby growing to 8-10 feet tall and wide within a few years
  • Can become larger with time and some supplemental water
  • Evergreen
  • Drought tolerant
  • Beautiful intricate branching pattern
  • Food source and habitat for many species of birds
  • Quercus turbinella; photo credit AH Harnes

    Quercus turbinella; Photo credit: AH Harris